Skip to main content

The Night of the Flood: A Novel in Stories

The Night of the Flood: A Novel in Stories goes on sale March 5. I invited the editors, E.A. Aymar and Sarah M. Chen, to tell us more about it:

It happened the night Maggie Wilbourne was to be put to death, the first woman executed by the state of Pennsylvania in modern times. That was when a group of women passionately protesting Maggie’s imprisonment struck. They blew up a local dam, flooding the town of Everton and indirectly inspiring a hellish night of crime and chaos.

Fourteen of today’s most exciting contemporary crime writers will take you to the fictional town of Everton, with stories from criminals, cops, and civilians that explore the thin line between the rich and the poor, the insider and the outsider, the innocent and the guilty. Whether it’s a store owner grimly protecting his property from looters, an opportunistic servant who sees her time to strike, or two misguided youths taking their anger out against any available victim, The Night of the Flood is an intricate and intimate examination of the moment when chaos is released—in both society and the human spirit.

Contributors: E.A. Aymar, Rob Brunet, Sarah M. Chen, Angel Luis Colón, Hilary Davidson, Mark Edwards, Gwen Florio, Elizabeth Heiter, J.J. Hensley, Jennifer Hillier, Shannon Kirk, Jenny Milchman, Alan Orloff, and Wendy Tyson. With a guest introduction from Hank Phillippi Ryan.

To order the book, visit https://downandoutbooks.com/bookstore/aymar-chen-night-flood.

And here's a line from each chapter:

Too much blood has flowed in this town, too many tears have been spilled. Time for us to wash it all away.
Jenny Milchman, page 7

Ken looked toward her.
"Heard you were a crazy bitch."
"Sounds about right," Callie agreed.
E.A. Aymar, page 25

With the window down, I could hear it—the sounds of a town dying.
Wendy Tyson, page 40

Talk and keep your enemies talking.
People rarely pull triggers while they are talking.
Rarely.
J.J. Hensley, page 61

"Not fire," she hisses.
There’s a tremble in that hiss.
"Flood."
Mark Edwards, page 90

He stared at the money again. Everything from the vault and from the tellers’ drawers. Ninety-seven thousand, four hundred and twelve dollars.
It would be a start.
A pretty damn good one.
Alan Orloff, page 101

Few things on God’s green earth really sink my heart into the depths of my gut like the sound of a perfectly good pint glass shattering.
Angel Luis Colon, page 126

As Marta understood it, Maggie Wilbourne had wreaked her revenge on her assailant, a final satisfaction not accorded the dead women of Ciudad Juarez; and that the death prescribed as Maggie’s punishment involved a clean bright room, a sterilized needle in the arm, oblivion. Not darkness. Violation. Terror.
Gwen Florio, page 142

But who gives a shit what people say. We got ourselves a right flood, and I aim to sedate my rage.
Shannon Kirk, page 162

What good’s a disaster if ya don’t get in on the mayhem?
Rob Brunet, page 188

Take your kids and run to higher ground warned a whispery voice; before Miranda could ask who the hell was calling, the line had gone dead.
Hilary Davidson, page 216

Kevin weighed the gun in the palm of his hand. It felt strange and heavy. He thought he’d feel better holding it. A tough guy.
It made him feel weaker.
Sarah M. Chen, page 237

He could sense it, almost smell it. His prey was here. His first kill.
Elizabeth Heiter, page 260

We blew up the dam, and we washed away the sins of this town.
But it's not over.
It will never be over.
Jennifer Hillier, page 281

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Chris Leek talks GOSPEL OF THE BULLET

Mitchel McCann may have lost a war, but he never lost his belief. The preacher kept his faith throughout all the blood and the dying; trading his pulpit for a saddle and delivering his sermons with a brace of Walker Colts. McCann still believes in God, but he is no longer sure that God believes in him. Now fate has given him a chance at redemption; the opportunity to save a life instead of taking one.

Justice Simpson was only seven years old when she lost father. She has been losing steadily ever since. The Yankee ball that did for Dan Simpson also killed his wife, Rosalee, although it took another nine years to do it. Alone and destitute on the unforgiving streets of Saint Joseph, Missouri, Justice knows that the sooner or later the bullet will find her too.

In the winter of 1872 the war is long over, but on the Kansas—Missouri border old wounds are slow to heal and they leave ugly scars. The past is something that neither the preacher nor the girl can escape.


2019 Derringer Finalist Josh Pachter

I'm a member of the Short Mystery Fiction Society, an informal association of writers, publishers, and fans that has kept mystery & crime short stories in the public eye since 1996. On April 4, the Society announced the finalists for its 2019 Derringer Awards. A vote of the membership will determine the winners, to be announced in May.

In the meantime, I'm inviting the finalists for interviews. If you'd like to participate, email me your answers to the same following questions.

Josh Pachter's story, "If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Murder", is one of four published in Malice Domestic 13: Mystery Most Geographical contending this year for the Best Short Story Derringer (stories ranging from 1,001 to 4,000 words). Good luck to all.

Describe your story in up to 20 words.

A British bus tour of Belgium and The Netherlands is interrupted by a classical dying-message murder ...whodunnit?!

What were the most difficult and most enjoyable parts of writing the story?

2019 Derringer Finalist Alan Orloff

I'm a member of the Short Mystery Fiction Society, an informal association of writers, publishers, and fans that has kept mystery & crime short stories in the public eye since 1996. On April 4, the Society announced the finalists for its 2019 Derringer Awards. A vote of the membership will determine the winners, to be announced in May.

In the meantime, I'm inviting the finalists for interviews. If you'd like to participate, email me your answers to the same following questions.

Alan Orloff is a Derringer finalist for the second year in a row. His story, "Dying in Dokesville", is one of four from Malice Domestic 13: Mystery Most Geographical contending this year for the Best Short Story Derringer (stories ranging from 1,001 to 4,000 words). Good luck to all.

Describe your story in up to 20 words.

A total eclipse means different things to different people. A sign from above? A spiritual communion? Opportunity for grand larceny?

What were the most difficult and mos…