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About HIGH CRIMES by Libby Fischer Hellmann

On November 1, Chicago crime writer Libby Fischer Hellmann publishes her fifth Georgia Davis P.I. novel, High Crimes, in trade paperback, ebook, and audio. Thanks to publicist Wiley Saichek for the heads-up:

How do you solve a murder when there are 42,000 suspects? That’s the task facing Chicago PI Georgia Davis, hired to hunt down those ultimately responsible for the assassination of Resistance leader Dena Baldwin at a demonstration fourteen months after the 2016 election. The gunman, on a hotel rooftop near Grant Park, dies within minutes of the shooting. As Georgia sifts through Dena’s 42,000 Facebook followers, she discovers that unknown enemies hiding behind fake profiles have infiltrated the group. She finds others who will do whatever it takes—including murder—to shield right-wing, wealthy elites. When Georgia begins piecing together the facts, relatives of both victims mysteriously disappear, and the danger escalates. Threats and bruises have never frightened Georgia, but she’…
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ROBERT B. PARKER'S BLOOD FEUD by Mike Lupica

Created by Robert B. Parker in 1999 to be played by Helen Hunt in feature films that didn't come to fruition, first-person P.I. Sunny Randall did appear as the main character in six books by Parker, and now joins the continuation effort by Parker's estate and publisher.

On sale November 27, no sooner does Robert B. Parker's Blood Feud see Sunny back with Richie Burke—the ex-husband she still loves—than Richie is shot as a message to his mobster father, Desmond.

Bolstering his gripping premise, Mike Lupica has done his homework on Sunny, Parker's supporting characters (Tony Marcus, Vinnie Morris, Frank Belson, Susan Silverman), and fellow Parker continuation authors' books—all helping warm up readers less familiar or less enamored with Sunny. There's also no shortage of action as Desmond's unknown nemesis continues picking off Burkes.

Thanks to G.P. Putnam's Sons' Katie McKee for the review galley.

ROBERT B. PARKER'S COLORBLIND by Reed Farrel Coleman

In Reed Farrel Coleman's fifth Jesse Stone continuation, the Paradise, Massachusetts police chief is back from a stint in alcohol rehab, investigating a racially-motivated assault that has left African American Felicity Wileford near death. With racial tensions on the rise in Paradise and the surrounding towns, Alisha Davis, the only black Paradise PD officer, is accused of shooting an unarmed white man.

Thanks to the third-person, multi-viewpoint style of the Jesse Stone books, readers find out very soon that a racist militia looking to spread is behind both incidents. As a longtime Parker and Coleman fan, I was more intrigued by the predicaments Jesse and Alisha faced because of the incidents than any sense of mystery.

On the personal front, Robert B. Parker's Colorblind marks Jesse's first authentic attempt to stop drinking, by attending Alcoholics Anonymous meetings. This gives longtime readers a fresh look at what had been relegated to a background vice in Parker'…

Bum Deal by Paul Levine

Thanks to publicist Wiley Saichek, I got to read a galley of Paul Levine's final Jake Lassiter novel, on sale June 12 from Thomas and Mercer.

Following last year's Bum Luck, linebacker-turned-lawyer Jake is still suffering from what may be CTE. Because suspected murder victim Sofia Calvert's father is one of D.A. Ray Pincher's financial backers, Pincher recuses himself and asks Jake to prosecute Sofia's likely killer husband, coolly menacing Dr. Clark Calvert.

Defending Dr. Calvert are Lassiter's friends Steve Solomon and Victoria Lord, Lord one of Clark's former flames, much to Steve's dismay.

The plot is tantalizing, topical, and twisty, as I expect from Levine, with the key players pursuing their own agendas. The main draw once again, though, is Jake, valiantly battling his symptoms along with the others' deceptions.

As much as I regret seeing the series end, I applaud Levine's brave choice to have Jake face CTE in the final two books. Well pl…

The Fairfax Incident by Terrence McCauley

Against all evidence, New York insurance executive Walter Fairfax's widow is convinced her husband did not commit suicide. Mrs. Fairfax hires ex-Marine, ex-cop-turned-P.I. Charlie Doherty to investigate Walter's death. Charlie discovers not only Mr. Fairfax's link to a much wider-ranging, more sinister plot but also the truth about his own benefactor, Harriman Van Dorn.

A follow-up to Terrence McCauley's 2013 novel Slow Burn, The Fairfax Incident is set a year later, 1933. I haven't read the previous novel, but Charlie's world-weary voice and McCauley's eye for detail quickly transported me to the period. And just as Charlie seems a pawn in the larger scheme of the story, I have to admire McCauley's use of The Fairfax Incident to tie Charlie into his University espionage series.

The Fairfax Incident goes on sale June 5.

2018 Derringer Finalist Andrew McAleer

I'm a member of the Short Mystery Fiction Society, an informal association of writers, publishers, and fans that has kept mystery & crime short stories in the public eye since 1996. On April 15, the Society announced the finalists for its 2018 Derringer Awards. Members are voting to determine the winners, to be announced May 15.

In the meantime, as I did last year, I'm inviting the finalists for interviews.

Andrew McAleer is a finalist with "King's Quarter" in the Best Novelette category, from Down & Out Books anthology Coast to Coast: Private Eyes from Sea to Shining Sea, for which he also had an editorial role.

How did you come to edit the two Coast to Coast anthologies? Tell us a bit about the editing process.

One of my favorite legal thriller writers William (“Bill”) G. Tapply, author of the Brady Coyne series, generously contributed a short story to a crime fiction magazine I edited devoted to short mystery stories called Crimestalker Casebook. When B…

2018 Derringer Finalist Paul D. Marks

I'm a member of the Short Mystery Fiction Society, an informal association of writers, publishers, and fans that has kept mystery & crime short stories in the public eye since 1996. On April 15, the Society announced the finalists for its 2018 Derringer Awards. Members are voting to determine the winners, to be announced May 15.

In the meantime, as I did last year, I'm inviting the finalists for interviews.

Paul D. Marks is a finalist with "Windward" in the Best Novelette category, from Down & Out Books anthology Coast to Coast: Private Eyes from Sea to Shining Sea, for which he also had an editorial role. "Windward" has also been included in The Best American Mystery Stories 2018 anthology.

How did you come to edit the two Coast to Coast anthologies? Tell us a bit about the editing process:

Andy and I are on opposite coasts, Boston and L.A., respectively. The interesting thing about the editing process is that, though we’ve known each other for years…