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PAPER SON by S.J. Rozan

I'm a longtime fan of S.J. Rozan's Lydia Chin and Bill Smith private eye novels, each of which she writes from the viewpoint of either twentysomething American-born Chinese Lydia or fortysomething white ex-Navy man Bill. As soon as I heard Rozan was returning to the series after eight years, I pre-ordered Paper Son, published July 2 by Pegasus Books.

On her mother's orders, Lydia and Bill leave their home base of New York City for the Mississippi Delta to help a cousin Lydia didn't know she had, who's been arrested on suspicion of killing his father. The partners' investigation uncovers other families' secrets just as shocking.

Though Mississippi is uncharted territory for Lydia and Bill, Rozan reliably evokes place and its impact on character to refresh the series and push the hot buttons of immigration, identity politics, and fantasy sports betting.
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THE SHAMELESS by Ace Atkins

In Atkins' ninth Quinn Colson novel, on sale July 9, a pair of New York journalists arrives in Tibbehah County, Mississippi questioning the twenty-year-old apparent suicide of teenager Brandon Taylor. Competing for Sheriff Colson's attention are various criminal elements that have sprung up since supervisor Johnny Stagg has been in prison.

Ace Atkins sent me a copy of the first Colson book, The Ranger, after I interviewed him about being named to continue Robert B. Parker's Spenser in April 2010. Having been a Colson fan since then, I've seen the series naturally expand beyond Quinn and the the central case of each book. With long-running subplots and continuing characters' lives, there's less a feeling of resolution, more a feeling that what happens in the moment will reverberate in the future.

Thanks to G.P. Putnam's Sons' Katie McKee for the galley.

On sale June 11, NO RIGHT WAY by Michael Niemann

Publicist Wiley Saichek sends word of Michael Niemann's fourth international thriller, on sale in three weeks from Coffeetown Press:

It is the fall of 2015. The refugee stream from Syria into Turkey has swelled to unprecedented numbers. Valentin Vermeulen, investigator for the United Nations Office of Internal Oversight Services, is sent to check that the money sent to alleviate the crisis is spent for the intended purposes.

He visits a newly established UN sub-office in Gaziantep, southern Turkey. After being stood up by the local administrator, Vermeulen spends the weekend in Kilis to see if the refugees not living in official camps receive proper aid. He makes his way to a rough tent camp. None of the refugees there have received any aid.

At the camp, he meets Rima, who’s questioned by the police in connection with the murder of her friend. His decision to help her sets in motion a violent confrontation from which they barely escape. Despite her plea for help, he has to go back …

2019 Derringer Finalist Sylvia Maultash Warsh

I'm a member of the Short Mystery Fiction Society, an informal association of writers, publishers, and fans that has kept mystery & crime short stories in the public eye since 1996. On April 4, the Society announced the finalists for its 2019 Derringer Awards. An April 15–30 vote of the membership determined the winners, announced May 1.

I still hope to interview any 2019 finalists I've missed. Email me your answers to the following questions.

Sylvia Maultash Warsh's Mystery Most Geograpical story "The Cabin in the Woods" was one of four Best Short Story Derringer finalists from the 2018 Malice Domestic anthology.



Describe your story in up to 20 words.

A woman stays in the cabin she inherited from her estranged mother and learns the painful truth about her father.

What were the most difficult and most enjoyable parts of writing the story?

I had a lot of backstory and had to decide whether to use narrative or “show” it in scenes. At first, I wrote scenes for some…

2019 Derringer Winner Leslie Budewitz

I'm a member of the Short Mystery Fiction Society, an informal association of writers, publishers, and fans that has kept mystery & crime short stories in the public eye since 1996. On April 4, the Society announced the finalists for its 2019 Derringer Awards. An April 15–30 vote of the membership determined the winners, announced May 1.

I still hope to interview any 2019 finalists I've missed. Email me your answers to the following questions.

Leslie Budewitz's January/February 2018 Suspense Magazine story "With My Eyes" won the Derringer for Best Long Story (ranging 4,001 to 8,000 words).



Describe your story in up to 20 words.

A young Seattle banker falls for a beautiful Greek woman and sees what he wants to see, until an eye-opening trip to Athens.

What were the most difficult and most enjoyable parts of writing the story?

This story was sparked by a trip to the Parthenon nearly 20 years ago. An elderly woman was pitching her guiding services to tourists by po…

ROBERT B. PARKER'S BUCKSKIN by Robert Knott

On sale today, Knott's sixth book building on Parker's four about Old West marshals Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch finds the lawmen working to defuse tension between two businesses vying for a gold claim.

Not as much a Western fan as I am a P.I. fan, this is the first of Knott's continuations I've read, but his knack for Parker's later style is clear, particularly how Parker wrapped mysteries in Westerns' well-known machismo.

My thanks to G.P. Putnam's Sons' Katie McKee for the galley.

2019 Derringer Finalist Barry Lancet

I'm a member of the Short Mystery Fiction Society, an informal association of writers, publishers, and fans that has kept mystery & crime short stories in the public eye since 1996. On April 4, the Society announced the finalists for its 2019 Derringer Awards. An April 15–30 vote of the membership determined the winners, announced May 1.

I still hope to interview any 2019 finalists I've missed. Email me your answers to the following questions.

Barry Lancet's March 2018 Down & Out: The Magazine story "Three-Star Sushi" was a Best Novelette Derringer contender.


Briefly describe your story.

A Japanese family calls on Jim Brodie, an old family friend, to find their kidnapped daughter and pry their ninth-generation Tokyo sushi shop loose from the yakuza and a shady land developer. Demons enough for one case, but Brodie finds worse demons under the family’s own roof.

What were the most difficult and most enjoyable parts of writing the story?

I always want to take …